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NEVADAFWO: Building Schoolyard Habitats
California-Nevada Offices , July 27, 2011
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Teachers Lynn Clifton (right), from Crestwood Elementary School in Las Vegas, and Janie Lampron (left), from Ober Elementary in Summerlin, NV, plant native Mojave plants in a raised  bed for a pollinator garden at C.T. Sewell Elementary School.  Both C.T. Sewell and Ober Elementary Schools have received Service funding  for School Yard Habitat projects.  Crestwood Elementary is in the planning process and hopes to have a project in the near future.
Teachers Lynn Clifton (right), from Crestwood Elementary School in Las Vegas, and Janie Lampron (left), from Ober Elementary in Summerlin, NV, plant native Mojave plants in a raised bed for a pollinator garden at C.T. Sewell Elementary School. Both C.T. Sewell and Ober Elementary Schools have received Service funding for School Yard Habitat projects. Crestwood Elementary is in the planning process and hopes to have a project in the near future. - Photo Credit: Jeannie Stafford/USFWS

By Jeannie Stafford, public affairs specialist, Nevada FWO

As part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s continuing commitment to connecting people with nature, Michelle Hunt, the Nevada FWO’s Schoolyard Habitat Coordinator, and 12 teachers and partners attended the Earth Partnership for Schools Institute Train-The-Trainer last summer. These trained facilitators developed and provided Mojave Desert restoration and Great Basin and Sierra Nevada restoration program training to teachers in both southern and northern Nevada this spring.

The facilitators are hopeful the teachers that attended the training will return to their schools and together, with their students, create a schoolyard habitat project on school grounds that they can use for years to come. By having students transform school landscapes into natural habitats, their studies of science, math and related subjects will be enhanced by experiencing "hands-on" learning outdoors.

These student-driven projects are ecologically sound, enhancing the wildlife habitat and aesthetics of their campuses. Typical projects created through this program include: wetlands, meadows, forests and variations among them based on specific ecoregions. Many projects are planned through multiple phases and become more dynamic over time as children from various classes build upon the existing work of past students. 


Contact Info: Jeannie Stafford, 775-861-6300, jeannie_stafford@fws.gov



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