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San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Hosts Two Biological Interns and One SCEP
Southwest Region, May 17, 2011
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Clay Noss, with ACE, reoves a western tanager from a net durinh MAPS banding.  Photo by Christopher D. Lohrengel, 5/24/2011, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ
Clay Noss, with ACE, reoves a western tanager from a net durinh MAPS banding. Photo by Christopher D. Lohrengel, 5/24/2011, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ - Photo Credit: n/a
Kacey King holding her first Gila monster.  Photo by Christopher D. Lohrengel, 6/30/2011, San Bernardino NWR, Cochise County, AZ
Kacey King holding her first Gila monster. Photo by Christopher D. Lohrengel, 6/30/2011, San Bernardino NWR, Cochise County, AZ - Photo Credit: n/a
Reggie Perkins electrofishing during a fish salvage operation.  Photo by Christopher D. Lohrengel, 7/7/2011, Southwestern Research Station, Portal, AZ
Reggie Perkins electrofishing during a fish salvage operation. Photo by Christopher D. Lohrengel, 7/7/2011, Southwestern Research Station, Portal, AZ - Photo Credit: n/a

This year the refuge was lucky enough to be able to hire two biological interns, Clay Noss and Kacey King, to assist with the many inventory and monitoring (I & M) surveys that take place on the refuge during the summer field season.  The interns were hired through American Conservation Experience (ACE), a fairly new and locally operated organization based out of Flagstaff, AZ.  These interns are gaining valuable practical experience in biological work, while providing the refuge much needed support.  With such a small refuge staff, making sure that all of the I & M surveys (there are generally 14-15 different surveys annually) are completed sometimes means other areas of operations may be shorted.

Also this summer, the Refuge is hosting a SCEP (Student Career Experience Program) student, Reggie Perkins.  Reggie recently graduate from Langston University in Oklahoma with his Bachelor's Degree in Natural Resource Management and plans on attending Oklahoma State University this fall to begin work towards a Master's Degree in the same discipline.  Since Reggie is an actual employee of the service, his contributions are a bit different then our other interns.  Reggie is learning about some of the inner working s of the services biological program including the endangered species databases, biological protocols used in the service and working within a budget to accomplish the Refuge's biological goals.


Contact Info: Christopher Lohrengel, 520-364-2104 x.106, chris_lohrengel@fws.gov



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