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Rogers Lake Dedication Ceremony
Southwest Region, June 10, 2011
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Courtesy of Shaula Hedwall, FWS, 6/10/2011, Dedication Ceremony
Courtesy of Shaula Hedwall, FWS, 6/10/2011, Dedication Ceremony - Photo Credit: n/a
Courtesy of Shaula Hedwall, FWS, 6/10/2011, Ground-Level Lake View
Courtesy of Shaula Hedwall, FWS, 6/10/2011, Ground-Level Lake View - Photo Credit: n/a
Courtesy of Shaula Hedwall, FWS, 3/25/2004, Aerial View of Lake
Courtesy of Shaula Hedwall, FWS, 3/25/2004, Aerial View of Lake - Photo Credit: n/a

The FWS has been working toward conservation of Rogers Lake in collaboration with Coconino County  and other partners for the last 10 years.  On November 1, 2010, Coconino County was able to buy the property through the Arizona Preserve Initiative, Growing Smarter Funds, and Coconino County Open Space Initiative in order to protect this natural treasure.  On June 10, 2011, Coconino County held a dedication ceremony to honor all of those entities, including the FWS, for their contributions in acquiring, protecting, and preserving Rogers Lake.  We will continue to work with the County and our other partners to develop and implement a management plan for the area.

Rogers Lake, located about 10 miles west of Flagstaff, Arizona, is a historically and regionally significant ephemeral wetland.  It is located along the Woody Ridge wildlife movement corridor, and during the wet seasons is an important source of water for wildlife, particularly waterfowl and other migratory birds.  In addition, Mexican spotted owls and bald eagles, federally protected species under the Endangered Species Act (Act) and Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, respectively, use habitat within and adjacent to the lake.  The wetland at Rogers Lake attracts abundant migratory waterfowl and significant numbers of wintering bald eagles.  The habitat will also be ideal for reintroductions of the northern leopard frog, an Arizona Game and Fish Department Species of Greatest Conservation Need and a species that the FWS is currently evaluating for listing under the Act.  Besides the high conservation value of the lands, the area provides valuable opportunities for public education and wildlife-based recreation, such as wildlife watching and hunting.

 


Contact Info: Nick Carrillo, (602) 242-0210x203, nick_carrillo@fws.gov



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