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Tishomingo NWR Pollinator Program in Full Swing
Southwest Region, June 2, 2011
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Bryan Reynolds of the Butterflies of the World Foundation speaking at Tishomingo NWR.
Bryan Reynolds of the Butterflies of the World Foundation speaking at Tishomingo NWR. - Photo Credit: n/a
Rain Crow Pond wildflower area on Tishomingo NWR
Rain Crow Pond wildflower area on Tishomingo NWR - Photo Credit: n/a
Craven Nature Trail wildflower area on Tishomingo NWR
Craven Nature Trail wildflower area on Tishomingo NWR - Photo Credit: n/a

Since 2006 Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge has been working on restoring native wildflowers to refuge grasslands. This project lies at the very "heart" of the biological integrity of not only the refuge itself but as a key educational component of the importance of pollinators to the world around us.

In the words of Washington D.C. Fish and Wildlife Service Biologists Mike Higgins and Bob Adamcik "…We now have a responsibility to recognize and incorporate the needs of pollinators into our management. Addressing their needs often has broader implications related to managing for biodiversity and biological integrity in general. We often think of birds as the indicators of environmental conditions yet pollinators are in fact a far better way to measure whether an ecosystem is intact and healthy. When pollinators are in trouble, ecosystems are in trouble. There is increasing evidence that many pollinators species are in decline, so it is appropriate that the Refuge System take a lead in conserving them. "

Tishomingo NWR has established several small native wildflower areas along the entrance roadway and incorporates wildflower seeds in their prairie restoration plantings. The refuge recently held an educational program in cooperation with the Butterflies of the World Foundation an organization dedicated to improving public awareness of the conservation of butterflies and their habitats.

Tishomingo NWR is becoming well known for its diverse butterfly population with 67 different species recorded in their 2009 butterfly brochure. The refuge hosts a yearly butterfly count in cooperation with the North American Butterfly Association with this year's count scheduled for June 24th as part of National Pollinator Week.


Contact Info: Kristopher Patton, (580) 371-2402, Kris_Patton@fws.gov



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