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HOPPER MOUNTAIN NWRC: Project Leader Weitzel Moving On After 19 Years
California-Nevada Offices , December 21, 2010
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Marc Weitzel (right), early in his tenure as project leader, and a co-worker stand outside the entrance to the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex office. (USFWS Photo)
Marc Weitzel (right), early in his tenure as project leader, and a co-worker stand outside the entrance to the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex office. (USFWS Photo) - Photo Credit: n/a
Marc Weitzel (left) shakes hands with then-Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne. (USFWS Photo)
Marc Weitzel (left) shakes hands with then-Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne. (USFWS Photo) - Photo Credit: n/a

By Michael Woodbridge, Hopper Mountain NWR Complex

 

For many, New Years is a time for new beginnings.  For Marc Weitzel, his new beginning starts on January 3.  Weitzel has been the project leader for the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex and California Condor Recovery Program in Ventura, Calif., since 1991.  On January 3, he leaves Hopper Mountain and the National Wildlife Refuge System to start a new job with the Department of the Interior’s International Technical Assistance Program (ITAP).

 

When Marc Weitzel arrived at the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex as project leader 19 years ago, the complex consisted of the Hopper Mountain Refuge and a nascent California Condor Recovery Program.  During his tenure, Weitzel oversaw the addition of three more refuges to the complex:  Bitter Creek, Blue Ridge and Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes.

 

In 1991, the Condor Recovery Program was focused on captive breeding efforts in the zoos.  There were no free flying condors in California.  It wasn’t until 1992 that condors were once again released to fly free in the skies of California.  During Weitzel’s tenure, the refuge complex took on overall Condor Recovery Program responsibility.  Previously, some program activities were under the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s ecological services branch.  Today, the condor population has reached 380 birds and 190 of those are free flying in California, Arizona, Utah and Baja Mexico.

 

Performing his new role of senior advisor and project manager for the Department of the Interior's’s ITAP should be easy for Weitzel.  He’s been working on international programs as a collateral duty throughout his entire time serving as project leader.  In his new position, Weitzel will manage projects in Eurasia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East, and Latin America, among others.

 

While the staff at the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex is excited for Marc Weitzel’s new endeavor, he will be missed.


Contact Info: Michael Woodbridge, 916-978-4445, michael_woodbridge@fws.gov



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