Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
Missouri University Fisheries Techniques River Field Day Year 6
Midwest Region, October 22, 2010
Print Friendly Version
Wyatt Doyle instructs Mizzou students on the bank of the Missouri River. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)
Wyatt Doyle instructs Mizzou students on the bank of the Missouri River. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo) - Photo Credit: n/a
Mizzou student, Dawn Searcy, proudly holds her first pallid sturgeon catch.  (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)
Mizzou student, Dawn Searcy, proudly holds her first pallid sturgeon catch.  (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo) - Photo Credit: n/a

Nine eager, however reserved, Mizzou students and their gregarious professor met us at the boat ramp ready to work on the Big Muddy.  Unlike past years, we had “chamber of commerce” weather for this years’ field day – shiny and brisk, a beautiful autumn day to be out on the river fishing. 

Missouri River Branch Chief, Wyatt Doyle, introduced the class to an abbreviated version of the issues swirling around the Missouri River and explained our specific role in the effort to recover the endangered pallid sturgeon. 

Sensing their collective reluctance to speak out, Wyatt began peppering the students with questions until the answers (and laughter) flowed freely.  Students then divided into four groups to get hands-on training with stern trawling, trotlining, gill netting and push trawling.  Objectives of working on the river were discussed, as well as our different Missouri River projects.  

The students seemed to enjoy getting a different aspect of fisheries management and a change in scenery from the ponds they had been working on all semester.  Everyone was treated to an opportunity to see the “star of the show.” 

A pallid sturgeon was captured in the first gill net to be pulled.  Students had a front row seat to watch the process as measurements were taken, genetic samples removed, a microchip inserted and pictures were snapped.  Students were also treated to a variety of river fishes including; shovelnose sturgeon, catfish, gar, blue sucker, silver carp and several chub species.

 For six years Columbia FWCO has assisted Dr. Douglas Noltie and the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) with teaching the big river component of his Fisheries Techniques course.  As most Midwestern fisheries management occurs on impoundments or reservoirs, Dr. Noltie’s Fish Techniques class generally addresses issues surrounding lakes and ponds. 

Realizing riverine fisheries management is a growing area of fisheries sciences, Dr. Noltie has enlisted the resources of Columbia FWCO to introduce his students to the Missouri River.  In the past, working with students MU has not only enabled the Columbia FWCO to shed light on new developments in riverine sampling techniques but also has provided our office an opportunity to get to know prospective student interns. 

For many of the students, this field day was extended for another opportunity to participate in a job shadow assignment.  We were honored to be a part of this class and hope that the students and Dr. Noltie enjoyed their experience on the Big Muddy. 


Contact Info: Patricia Herman, 573-234-2132 x170, Patricia_Herman@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer