Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
TETLIN: Rural Alaska Students Branch Out with Summer Botany Course
Alaska Region, August 23, 2010
Print Friendly Version
Tetlin NWR Boreal Botany students at UAF-Georgeson Botanical Gardens in Fairbanks, Aug 11, 2010.  Photo by Mary Timm
Tetlin NWR Boreal Botany students at UAF-Georgeson Botanical Gardens in Fairbanks, Aug 11, 2010. Photo by Mary Timm - Photo Credit: n/a
Tetlin NWR Boreal Botany class on denali Highway, Alaska, Aug 11, 2010.  Photo by Mary Timm.
Tetlin NWR Boreal Botany class on denali Highway, Alaska, Aug 11, 2010. Photo by Mary Timm. - Photo Credit: n/a
Tetlin NWR Boreal Botany fieldtrip to Fairbanks, July 23, 2010.  Photo by Barb Pine.
Tetlin NWR Boreal Botany fieldtrip to Fairbanks, July 23, 2010. Photo by Barb Pine. - Photo Credit: n/a

For the second year in a row, Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) enabled local high school students to supplement  normal coursework with a field course focused on refuge ecology.  This summer’s course was “Boreal Botany” as students identified local flora, learned  the role of fire, and examined habitat requirements of various plants, invasive species and data collection procedures. Upon completion of the course, students received one high school credit through the Alaska Gateway School District. 

From early June through mid-September, seven students met twice a week for three hours each day.  Two field trips and plant walks got students outside, observing, collecting and camping.  Additional field trips took them from Tetlin Refuge headquarters in tiny Tok (pop. 1,500) to Fairbanks to visit UAF Botanical Gardens and “Friends of Creamers Field” bird refuge. Another field trip to the Denali Highway had students discovering riparian species, and plant species adapted to high elevations.  Bureau of Land Management staff also taught students about white sweet clover, an invasive plant species along the Dalton Highway.

This project-based course required each student to complete an oral presentation on a medicinal plant, teach peers about a specific topic, and amass a collection of at least 50 plant species. At the concluding "Parent's Night," students presented their projects and shared their class stories and exploits with families and community members.  All in all, students, parents and the community graded the course a botanical “A.”.

This course was funded through Challenge Cost Share with the school district with funds used for books, plant presses, mounting supplies, field trips and construction of an outdoor classroom adjacent to refuge headquarters.

 


Contact Info: Mary Timm, 907-883-9419, mary_timm@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer