Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
REGION 8: Region Celebrates Duck Stamp's Role in Conservation During First Day of Sale Event at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR
California-Nevada Offices , June 25, 2010
Print Friendly Version
Regional Director Ren Lohoefener shows off the 2010-2011 Federal Duck Stamp following his purchase of the stamp June 25, 2010 at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. (photo: Courtney Ashe, California Waterfowl)
Regional Director Ren Lohoefener shows off the 2010-2011 Federal Duck Stamp following his purchase of the stamp June 25, 2010 at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. (photo: Courtney Ashe, California Waterfowl) - Photo Credit: n/a

by Scott Flaherty, Region 8 External Affairs
The Pacific Southwest Region and several conservation organizations celebrated habitat conservation during a First Day of Sale event for the 2010-2011 Federal Duck Stamp June 25 at LaRiviere Marsh at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Fremont, Calif. A group of about 30 Service and refuge staff, partners and refuge supporters attended the 30 minute event, which featured speakers from Ducks Unlimited, California Waterfowl, California Audubon and Florence LaRiviere, who organized local citizens to create the nation’s first urban refuge, the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR, in 1974.

"It was the Duck Stamp that helped create this refuge," said LaRiviere, for whom the marsh unit of the refuge was named. "Once people learned that sales of duck stamps could buy land for refuges, they supported creation of Don Edwards refuge."

Dr. Rudy Rosen, Western Region Director of Ducks Unlimited, said the Duck Stamp program set the stage for hunters contributing to habitat restoration, protection and management for habitat of waterfowl throughout the entire nation”.

“The Duck Stamp program allowed for the establishment of organizations like, Ducks Unlimited and other organizations that also contribute to wetland conservation,” Rosen said. “Because of these contributions, hunters have a vested interest in national wildlife refuges.”

Traditionally supported by waterfowl hunters, duck stamps are also popular with collectors, birders and other fans of conservation.

“The Duck Stamp fundamentally is about the conservation of wetlands and the bird species and wildlife that depend on wetlands,” said Graham Chisholm, executive director for Audubon California. “It’s important that it shouldn’t just be the hunting community buying these stamps. Every Californian should be investing in conservation by buying duck stamps”

Jake Messerli, vice president of conservation programs for California Waterfowl, told the gathering about the Junior Duck Stamp Program and its role in connecting youth with the natural world.

“Roughly 250,000 youths in California have a better understanding of biology, conservation and our outdoor heritage because of the junior duck stamp program,” he said.

Approximately 28,000 art entries are submitted each year to the national junior duck stamp program and hundreds of thousands of students participate in the programs environmental education curriculum in schools across the U.S., according to Messerli.

The morning event culminated in the purchase of the first federal duck stamp in California by Ren Lohoefener, Regional Director of the Service’s Pacific Southwest Region.

“I can remember buying my first duck stamp for $3 back in the 1970s,” said Lohoefener, “Since then a tremendous amount of land has been conserved for wetlands.”

The Pacific Southwest Region will host the 2010 Federal Duck Stamp Art Contest October 15-16 at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, Calif. The annual contest is the only art contest sponsored by the federal government and typically draws more than 200 entries from the nation's top wildlife artists. The top entry is used for the Federal Duck Stamp. Proceeds from the $15 stamp are used to acquire wetlands and associated habitat for national wildlife refuges. Since the program began in 1934, more than 5 million acres of wetlands and associated habitats have been purchased, including wetlands for 16 refuges in California.

More information about the Federal Duck Stamp and this year's art contest is availabe at: http://www.fws.gov/cno/duckstamp.html

 

 


Contact Info: Scott Flaherty, , Scott_Flaherty@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer