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LIVINGSTON STONE NFH: Descendents of Hatchery Namesake Visit Hatchery
California-Nevada Offices , January 22, 2010
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Right to left: Bonnie Case Great granddaughter, Bob Kirstein great grandson, Becky McCue Grand daughter, Cliff McCue her husband, Ned Kirstein Great grandson, Susan Kirstein his wife, and John Rueth Assistant Manager. (photo: USFWS) 
Right to left: Bonnie Case Great granddaughter, Bob Kirstein great grandson, Becky McCue Grand daughter, Cliff McCue her husband, Ned Kirstein Great grandson, Susan Kirstein his wife, and John Rueth Assistant Manager. (photo: USFWS)  - Photo Credit: n/a
Livingston Stone’s artifacts on display at Turtle Bay Museum. (photo: USFWS)
Livingston Stone’s artifacts on display at Turtle Bay Museum. (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a

by John Rueth, Livingston Stone NFH
The Pacific Southwest Region's Livingston Stone National Fish Hatchery was recently honored by a visit by the grandchildren of the hatchery's namesake, pioneering fish culturist Dr. Livingston Stone. Stone's granddaughter Rebecca McCue and great grandchildren Bonnie case, Bob Kirstein and Ned Kirstein.

The group family members were in nearby Redding, Calif., to help open an exhibit at the Turtle Bay Museum:  "Native Images: The Works of Edward Curtis and Thomas Houseworth Celebrate the Native American Heritage of the West and Take an in-depth Look at the McCloud River Wintu."

Assistant Hatchery Manager John Rueth provided the family a short tour of the hatchery  which is located at the foot of Shasta Dam north of Redding.

"It was a nice visit and it was interesting to hear being able too here the stories about the man this hatchery is named for, " Rueth said. "The exhibit at Turtle Bay Museum displays many of the early pictures of the hatchery and the surrounding area. It also included some of the families' personal artifacts."

According to the American Fisheries Society, Stone was named Deputy of the U.S. Fish Commission (forerunner of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) in 1872, and assigned to establish the Baird Hatchery in California, the state's first freshwater hatchery. He published the classic fish culture book "Domesticated Trout" the same year and it soon became a standard manual for fish culture. Stone recognized the interaction between the biological science and fish culture and was the first to recommend and request a trained biologist for hatchery staff.


Contact Info: John Rueth, 530-275-0549, john_rueth@fws.gov



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