Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
2009 Herpetological Monitoring On Leslie Canyon NWR Completes Tenth Year
Southwest Region, November 2, 2009
Print Friendly Version
Adult Madrean alligator lizard, one of the lizard species found in Leslie Canyon.  Photo by Chris Lohrengel, 4/8/2009, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ
Adult Madrean alligator lizard, one of the lizard species found in Leslie Canyon. Photo by Chris Lohrengel, 4/8/2009, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ - Photo Credit: n/a
Black-tailed rattlesnake, a shock when these are found in a trap.  Photo by Chris Lohrengel, 6/26/2009, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ
Black-tailed rattlesnake, a shock when these are found in a trap. Photo by Chris Lohrengel, 6/26/2009, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ - Photo Credit: n/a
Great Plains toad, one of the few amphibian species regularly captured in Leslie Canyon.  Photo by Chris Lohrengel, 6/29/2009, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ
Great Plains toad, one of the few amphibian species regularly captured in Leslie Canyon. Photo by Chris Lohrengel, 6/29/2009, Leslie Canyon NWR, Cochise County, AZ - Photo Credit: n/a

This completes the tenth year that San Bernardino NWR staff has been conducting herpetological monitoring on Leslie Canyon NWR.  The information gathered from this monitoring allows refuge staff to better understand ecological trends, investigate population dynamics and the roles of rare species, and helps justify resource management decisions.  While the emphasis of this monitoring is on terrestrial reptiles and amphibians, information is also gathered from the incidental captures of other organisms.  This year there were 357 captures, composed of seventeen reptile and amphibian species and eight mammal species.  This number is lower than last years total captures of 441.  Because of the abnormal rainfall patterns this year, good spring rains and lack of a monsoon, species captured and their associated numbers are off from the trend the refuge has seen in recent years.  This year many more lizard species associated with activity during cool humid periods, such as the great plains skink, were captured while species associated with hot dry periods, such as the Sonoran spotted whiptail, were down in number of captures.  Due to the lack of the monsoons, amphibian captures were also down quite a bit, with less than half of the expected amount captured.


Contact Info: Christopher Lohrengel, 520-364-2104 x.106, chris_lohrengel@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer