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ARCATA FWO: Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration Monitoring on the Klamath River, California
California-Nevada Offices , July 31, 2009
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Arcata FWO fish biologists check the catch from a frame net live box on the Klamath River. (photo: USFWS)
Arcata FWO fish biologists check the catch from a frame net live box on the Klamath River. (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a
Rotary screw traps are used to sample juvenile salmonid outmigrants on the Klamath River.  (photo: USFWS)
Rotary screw traps are used to sample juvenile salmonid outmigrants on the Klamath River.  (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a
Young-of-the-year Chinook salmon. (photo: USFWS)
Young-of-the-year Chinook salmon. (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a
The distended belly on this juvenile Chinook salmon is a clinical sign of Ceratomyxa shasta infection. (photo: USFWS)
The distended belly on this juvenile Chinook salmon is a clinical sign of Ceratomyxa shasta infection. (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a

by Steve Gough, Arcata FWO
Juvenile salmonid downstream migrant monitoring on the mainstem Klamath River has been conducted each spring since 2000 in a joint effort by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Arcata Fish and Wildlife Office (AFWO), Karuk Tribe of California, and USGS Fort Collins
Science Center.  The three main objectives of this study are to (1) estimate the number of young-of-the-year (YOY) Chinook and coho salmon outmigrants passing three selected locations on the Klamath River, (2) document losses of YOY salmon between the three selected sites, and (3) assess the prevalence of specific diseases in juvenile salmonids in coordination with the Service's California-Nevada Fish Health Center (CA-NV FHC).

Annual juvenile salmon outmigrant monitoring begins in March at three sites on the mainstem Klamath River between Iron Gate Dam and the Scott River confluence.  Rotary screw traps and frame nets are implemented for this sampling and are typically run four (Monday through Thursday) nights per week and checked daily while in operation.  Our trapping season typically concludes when Iron Gate Hatchery releases their hatchery-raised YOY Chinook salmon in mid- to late-May.

The CA-NV FHC annually investigates infection rates of Ceratomyxa shasta, Parvicapsula minibicornis, and other pathogens in juvenile salmonids in the Klamath River below Iron Gate Dam through QPCR assays and histology analyses.  Our field crew samples YOY Chinook salmon for this study on the mainstem Klamath River between the Shasta and Scott river confluences.  Fish health sampling concludes once the YOY Chinook salmon have migrated downstream and samples are no longer obtainable.

Updates and summaries of these projects are available at http://www.fws.gov/arcata/fisheries/projectUpdates.html.


Contact Info: Steve Gough, (707) 616-2326, steve_gough@fws.gov



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