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TOGIAK: A Formula for Success: Heavy Rains + High Winds = A Great Time at Togiak Lake
Alaska Region, August 4, 2009
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Campers had a chance to learn about fish counting at the tower on the Togiak River.
Campers had a chance to learn about fish counting at the tower on the Togiak River. - Photo Credit: n/a
Students had a chance to try their hand at archery during a rare break in the weather.
Students had a chance to try their hand at archery during a rare break in the weather. - Photo Credit: n/a
The hearty campers of the 2009 Togiak Lake EE Camp.
The hearty campers of the 2009 Togiak Lake EE Camp. - Photo Credit: n/a

For the second consecutive year at Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, the annual Cape Peirce Marine Science and Yup’ik Culture Camp was put on hold due to bear issues at Cape Peirce, a stunning area of rocky cliffs situated in the southwest corner of the Refuge. So for the second consecutive year, the shores of beautiful Togiak Lake served as a back-up site. Unlike last year which brought warm, sunny skies, high winds and heavy rains dominated  nearly four days of camp.

 

Eight area junior high students, representing five different schools, made the best of it on the shores of the lake, despite less than inviting weather conditions. Winds as strong as 50 mph and heavy downpours were prevalent over most of the days and nights.

 

The students who participated are to be commended. Their spirits remained high and their attitudes were stellar from start to finish. They logged an many hours of tent time during the week. Students gamely participated in the classroom sessions only to see the hands on/outdoor portions lost to the wind and rain.

 

Activities such as fly fishing, plaster casting animal tracks and application of wilderness survival skills fell victim to Mother Nature. A few brief lulls did allow students to practice catch and release angling and archery skills for short periods of time.

 

The group was able to visit a salmon counting tower (run by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game) on the Togiak River. Students were able to speak with tower workers to get a better understanding of how fish are counted and how those counts influence management of the fishery. They were given an opportunity to actively participate in a sampling activity.

 

At the end of it all, the 2nd Annual Togiak Science and Culture Camp was a smashing success. Why: because even the heavy rains and thick cloud cover couldn’t keep student spirits from shining bright.

 


Contact Info: Terry Fuller, 907-842-1063 ext. 8419, terry_fuller@fws.gov



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