Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
KANUTI: Film Crew Focuses on Annual Refuge Science Camp
Alaska Region, August 4, 2009
Print Friendly Version
Producer Jim Pfeiffenberger films Polluck Simon teaching students traditional methods for carving wooden boat paddles. July 2009. FWS photo.
Producer Jim Pfeiffenberger films Polluck Simon teaching students traditional methods for carving wooden boat paddles. July 2009. FWS photo. - Photo Credit: n/a
An elder teaches a student at the Henshaw Creek Weir Science camp how to weave a fishing net. July 2009. FWS photo.
An elder teaches a student at the Henshaw Creek Weir Science camp how to weave a fishing net. July 2009. FWS photo. - Photo Credit: n/a

Students at the Henshaw Creek Weir Science Camp in Kanuti Refuge in July were part of a special event that made their experience even more memorable than usual. For the first time, a film crew spent two days documenting camp activities and interviewing instructors, students, refuge staff and partners, to produce video pieces to show the public the work being done in Kanuti Refuge. The filming was done in partnership with Gates of the Arctic National Park and Tanana Chiefs Conference's “Fisheries Partners” Program.

Students and elders who participate in the camp reside in remote, fly-in villages near Kanuti Refuge whose residents are rely on refuge resources for their subsistence lifestyle. The elders' perspectives provided the film crew unique insights into the cultural significance of Kanuti Refuge. Videographers also captured footage of elders instructing students in traditional subsistence activities, including how to carve boat paddles, weave and mend fishing nets and use them to catch fish, cut fish for drying and smoking, build a smoke rack without nails or ropes, tan animal skins, and do traditional beading.

The film crew also interviewed refuge staff and partners on topics including the role of aviation in refuge management in Alaska; contributions of volunteers and friends groups (e.g., Friends of Alaska National Wildlife Refuges); why the refuge is investigating invertebrates, including dragonflies; and the role of Tanana Chiefs Conference's “Partners” Program in monitoring salmon escapement and providing education efforts like science camp. The film crew captured footage of campers learning fish identification and anatomy, salmon life cycles, stream ecology, aquatic insects, arctic animal adaptations, plant identification, careers in natural resources, and lessons in "living green."

The films produced at the science camp, along with others from nearby Gates of the Arctic National Park, will help visitors at the new interagency visitor center in Bettles understand  stewardship of these public lands. The visitor center/office is the field headquarters for Kanuti Refuge and one of three ranger stations for Gates of the Arctic National Park. The films will be adapted for exhibits in the visitor center and available on the web in 2010.


Contact Info: Joanna Fox, (907) 456-0330, joanna_fox@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer