Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
HOPPER MOUNTAIN NWRC: Peruvian Sayaka Inka Cultural Group Visits Refuge
California-Nevada Offices , June 20, 2009
Print Friendly Version
Clockwise from backrow left: Quipu; Anne-marie Charest; Kantuta; Estelle Sandhaus; Lloque; Ivett Plascencia; Rumi; Pillpy; and Gigi Rock (photo: USFWS)
Clockwise from backrow left: Quipu; Anne-marie Charest; Kantuta; Estelle Sandhaus; Lloque; Ivett Plascencia; Rumi; Pillpy; and Gigi Rock (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a
The Sayaka Inka Cultural Group view California condors on the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge (photo: USFWS)
The Sayaka Inka Cultural Group view California condors on the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a

by Ivett Plascencia and Michael Woodbridge, Hopper Mountain NWRC
During the weekend of June 20, 2009, Estelle Sandhaus from the Santa Barbara Zoo and Ivett Plascencia from the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex, hosted five natives from the Sayaka Inka Village in Peru, as well as three of their U.S. guides, during their journey in the United States.

The Andean indigenous cultural group came from the Sayaka Inka Village on the western shores of Lake Titikaka in Puno, Peru. They traveled to the U.S. to share their culture and music with the purpose of uniting the Condor People of the South and the Eagle People of the North. The Sayaka Inka Cultural Group has been in the U.S. since April 2009, gathering with Native American Tribes in Arizona and California. On Saturday, June 20, they traveled to the Santa Barbara Zoo, where four juvenile California condors are now on exhibit.  At the Zoo, the oldest brother, Rumi Mallku (Stone Condor) performed the condor dance for the four juveniles. Rumi dances with real Andean condor wings handed down through five generations.  When they return to Peru, the wings will be laid to rest forever in the River of the Condors. On Sunday, the group participated in a cultural exchange hosted by the Coastal Band of the Chumash Nation.  While the Chumash celebrated their summer equinox, the Lake Titikaka natives shared their music and dance in celebration of their winter equinox, which is also the Andean New Year.

On Monday, June 22, Sandhaus and Plascencia guided the Sayaka Inka Cultural Group to Hopper Mountain NWR to see a California condor in the wild. They were shown a recently used nest site and then, at an observation point, saw several condors flying in the distance. The Andean natives said a prayer for the California condor in their native dialect and played a song with their native flute. They were very grateful to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for taking care of the California condors as much as they take care of their Andean condors in Peru. The Peruvian natives felt it was very important for them to stand on the same earth where the California condors fly free. The group is also hoping to keep in touch and develop a partnership in the future.

More about the Sayaka Inka music, visit their Myspace page at: www.myspace.com/sayakainka


Contact Info: Michael Woodbridge, 916-978-4445, michael_woodbridge@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer