Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
SACRAMENTO NWR: Llano Seco Prescribed Burn Provides Training to State Firefighters
California-Nevada Offices , June 2, 2009
Print Friendly Version
A new firefighter from the Cal Fire Butte Unit gets training using a modified quad with drip torch to help ignite fire within the burn unit.

Photo by Kipp Morrill, USFWS, Assistance Fire Management Officer
A new firefighter from the Cal Fire Butte Unit gets training using a modified quad with drip torch to help ignite fire within the burn unit. Photo by Kipp Morrill, USFWS, Assistance Fire Management Officer - Photo Credit: n/a
New refuge firefighter uses a drip torch to ignite fire along the edge of the burn unit. 

Photo by Kipp Morrill
New refuge firefighter uses a drip torch to ignite fire along the edge of the burn unit. Photo by Kipp Morrill - Photo Credit: n/a

by Miriam Morrill, Sacramento NWRC

Prescribed burning has many benefits to wildlife habitats at the Llano Seco Unit of the Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge, located eight miles southwest of Chico, California.  On June 2, 2009, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (Service) conducted a prescribed burn on three upland habitat units, totaling three hundred, fifty acres.

 

Fire staff contacted the Cal Fire Butte County Unit to assist and provide training for new firefighters. The interagency training burn went off without a hitch.  Both collateral refuge staff and new state firefighters had the opportunity to work with experienced firefighters in a “live” fire training exercise.  Firefighters from both agencies were able to sign-off new items on their task books and the effort helped build camaraderie between fire crews. 

 

Some benefits to prescribed burning on the refuge are to burn-out invasive weeds which provide poor habitat for wildlife and increase the fire hazard.  The objective on one of the units was to burn-off the non-native seed beds and allow native grasses to come back into the area.  The objective for the other unit was to burn-off noxious weeds which were competing for water and space in restored vernal pool habitat areas. 

 

Please contact Fire Management Officer, Dale Shippelhoute, for more information at 530-934-2801. 

 

Report Author:  Jeremy McMahon

USFWS Fire Engine Captain

North Central Valley Fire Management Zone

 


Contact Info: Miriam Morrill, 530-934-2801, Miriam_Morrill@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer