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Missouri Private Lands Office helps Tiger Cubs Pack #90 in wildlife conservation
Midwest Region, November 10, 2008
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USFWS Private Lands Biologist Kelly Srigley Werner has Tiger Cubs Pack #90 experience the size and feel of a zebra skin while discussing endangered species. 
- Photo courtesy Greg Ray
USFWS Private Lands Biologist Kelly Srigley Werner has Tiger Cubs Pack #90 experience the size and feel of a zebra skin while discussing endangered species.

- Photo courtesy Greg Ray

- Photo Credit: n/a

The Missouri Private Lands Office met with Tiger Cub Pack #40 in mid November to discuss endangered species and how animals are often used for human comforts.  The Tiger Cub boy scouts are 6 and 7 year olds and just being introduced to scouting.  Currently, they are earning belt loops (similar to badges for older scouts) when they learn about a particular topic.  Wildlife Conservation is an important loop that each boy wants to earn so we met with them to talk about endangered species, how animals become endangered, and what they can do to help wildlife in their day to day activities.

We used the Endangered Species trunk to show the children different animal parts (pelts, tusks) and how animals are used to provide special comforts for people (combs, purses, jewelry, artwork, boots).  The Tiger Cubs quickly pointed out that “We don’t have to have combs made out of sea turtles, or purses made out of crocodiles, or statues made out of elephant ivory.”  They believed that it is more important to have animals live in the wild and we could make boots and purses out of other things that “weren’t going to make animals go endangered.”  The kids were big fans of Animal Planet and shared stories of animals they had seen in the wild like deer, bobcat, raccoons, and backyard birds.  Parents appreciated the presentation and explained that they too learned about endangered species and enjoyed watching their children’s enthusiastic response to the presentation.

To further their understanding of wildlife conservation the Tiger Cubs have to meet other requirements to earn their belt loop like preparing a report about an endangered species and making a poster which describes a food chain.  The Pack Leader was confident that the kids gained a greater appreciation about wildlife conservation to help them achieve their objective.


Contact Info: Kelly SrigleyWerner, 573-234-2132 x112, kelly_srigleywerner@fws.gov



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