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SEEDS Prairie Field Day: Another Success
Midwest Region, November 7, 2008
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Students watch the water change course as they alter the landscape
Students watch the water change course as they alter the landscape - Photo Credit: n/a
Becky Clearwater & Hilary Shaw with Pat Jones.  Pat Jones donated the 711 acre Prairie Fork area in 1997.
Becky Clearwater & Hilary Shaw with Pat Jones. Pat Jones donated the 711 acre Prairie Fork area in 1997. - Photo Credit: n/a
Students at the Pond Life Study station.
Students at the Pond Life Study station. - Photo Credit: n/a
Fourth Graders of Lee Expressive Arts School
Fourth Graders of Lee Expressive Arts School - Photo Credit: n/a

 

Students ventured out of the classroom to discover the outdoors with the SEEDS program (Students the Environment and Endangered Species) this fall.  Over 50 fourth graders from Lee Expressive Arts School loaded on the bus to attend a field study day at Prairie Fork Conservation Area in Williamsburg, Missouri. Prairie Fork is a 700 acre tract of land that was donated to the Missouri Department of Conservation by Pat Jones, who still lives on the property.   

                The Prairie Fork field day event was a continuation of the SEEDS program which was initiated by Administrative Officer Becky Clearwater in 2006.  This is the second year the Missouri Ecological Services office has been partners in education with Lee Expressive Arts School.  The SEEDS program provides the opportunity for the ES office staff to foster a love of nature in children in the Columbia area.

                Becky Clearwater and Hilary Shaw (Education Specialist), of the Columbia ES Office coordinated the event with volunteers from the Prairie Fork conservation Area.  The volunteers had four explorative activities for the children to do throughout the day.  One of the most popular activities was the crime scene.  Students had to use clues in the field to figure out what animal was eaten, and who ate it. The children used bits of fur and animal tracks to discover that a coyote had preyed on a rabbit.  Other activities included a nature scavenger hunt, a stream table demonstration to learn about human effects on erosion, and a pond life study.  

 "The students talked about their wonderful experience all the way home and I know they are excited to discuss all of their learning on Monday," said 4th grade teacher Stephanie DeWolf. The Prairie Fork Field Study provided a fun and educational opportunity to connect young people to nature.


Contact Info: Hilary Shaw, 573-234-2132 ext. 174, Hilary_Shaw@fws.gov



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