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STAFF NOTES
Southwest Region, November 7, 2008
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Pupfish Inventory at CPNWR
PUA Margot Bissell & OPCNM Tim Tibbits
Photo by Katarina Altshul
Oct 29, 2008, Ajo, AZ
Pupfish Inventory at CPNWR PUA Margot Bissell & OPCNM Tim Tibbits Photo by Katarina Altshul Oct 29, 2008, Ajo, AZ - Photo Credit: n/a
Boma with Tower, CPNWR 
Sonoran Pronghorn Pen, 1 of 2 corral traps or bomas with exiting tower in background
Photo by Jim Atkinson
September 2008
Boma with Tower, CPNWR Sonoran Pronghorn Pen, 1 of 2 corral traps or bomas with exiting tower in background Photo by Jim Atkinson September 2008 - Photo Credit: n/a

Since the fawn and yearling buck mortalities in late July and early August, the pronghorn population within the pen has stabilized and there have been no further losses.  Fifty-four pronghorn are currently present within the pen.   

 

Recently a radio-collared doe (319) had crossed into Mexico southwest of the Agua Dulce Mountains, the doe is now back in the U.S. and is generally ranging in the southern end of the Mohawk Valley.  

 

The most surprising discovery associated with the radio telemetry data was the relocation of one of pronghorn bucks (851) staff had released into the U.S. population earlier this year.  This individual was one of the five yearling bucks released from the pen earlier this year and has been missing since late March.  Staff had presumed he had lost his collar or had died.  Staff last located this Pronghorn on a tactical range within the Barry M. Goldwater Range on March 30.  During September, AZGFD staff found the yearling buck in Mexico.  After downloading the telemetry data (stored since March), staff observed a remarkable journey both within and outside the current identified range of Sonoran pronghorn.  In early March the yearling buck traveled west across the BMGR to the vicinity of Devils Hills, and then moved outside the current U.S. pronghorn range through the Cabeza Prieta Mountains to the southern end of the Tinajas Altas Mountains.  The individual then traveled south into Mexico crossing Highway 2, flanking the western side of the Pinacate Range and then traveled west to the vicinity of Highway 8.  This trip was approximately 30 miles south of the border.  The data also revealed that 851 had twice crossed Highway 85 (north of the Crater Range) during mid March.  The yearling buck is currently with a small group of pronghorn west of Highway 8 in Mexico.

 

The annual census of the refugia for Quitobaquito pupfish were counted in the two ponds located on the nature trail behind the Cabeza Prieta refuge visitor center.  Fifty pupfish were temporarily stored in the south pond from Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, in May of this year.  There were less than 25 fish in the pond at the time.  Staff counted 1,040 fish in the pond!  The north pond also contained over a thousand pupfish.  Staff observed large numbers of all age classes in both ponds.  Tim Tibbitts, biologist from OPCNM, Shawn Knapp and Clay Clowder of AZGF, and volunteers Pete and Katarina Altshul assisted Cabeza Prieta Staff with the count.                 

 

 


Contact Info: Rosie Cassou, 520-387-6483-4984, rosie_cassou@fws.gov



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