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National Wildlife Refuge Week Celebration at Deep Fork NWR
Southwest Region, October 12, 2008
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Volunteer sweeps around Refuge Kiosk.  Picture taken by Gail Storey.
Volunteer sweeps around Refuge Kiosk. Picture taken by Gail Storey. - Photo Credit: n/a
Glen Storey, Refuge volunteer, helps plant shrubs at the Cussetah Bottoms Boardwalk area.  Picture by Gail Storey
Glen Storey, Refuge volunteer, helps plant shrubs at the Cussetah Bottoms Boardwalk area. Picture by Gail Storey - Photo Credit: n/a
Lenard Thomas, Zoey Thomas, and Cameron Cross plant trees during National Wildlife Refuge Week/National Public Lands Day event on October 10, 2008.  Photo by Gail Storey
Lenard Thomas, Zoey Thomas, and Cameron Cross plant trees during National Wildlife Refuge Week/National Public Lands Day event on October 10, 2008. Photo by Gail Storey - Photo Credit: n/a

 

At Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge, members of the Friends of the Deep Fork, the Tulsa Audubon Society, local volunteers, and staff gathered on Sunday, October 12 to celebrate National Wildlife Refuge Week with a day of habitat improvement, clean-up, and bird observation.  Outdoor Recreation Planner (ORP) Lori Jones, who recently joined the staff at the Deep Fork, coordinated the activities and worked very hard to make the day a success.  The activities were conducted at the Cussetah Bottoms Boardwalk area at the Refuge. The day began with a Big Sit.  This is an annual day-long event sponsored by Bird Watcher’s Digest.  Observers sit in a 17-foot-diameter circle and count the types of birds that they see or hear.  Some top-notch birders from Tulsa Audubon were recruited to take a shift.  ORP Jones then led a nature walk at 1:00 pm.

Later in the afternoon, participants assisted with a habitat enhancement project, funded in part by a TogetherGreen Innovation Grant from Toyota that was awarded to the Tulsa Audubon Society.  Native trees and shrubs from Clear Creek Farm and Gardens, selected based on their value to wildlife and suitability to the habitat, were planted on the refuge.   Volunteers were treated to hamburgers,  hotdogs, chips, and beverages  provided by the Friends of the Deep Fork and prepared by Chairman of the Friends of the Deep Fork, Lenard Thomas.  Participants received a TogetherGreen T-shirt and a free pass to any national park, monument, or refuge.      

      By the end of the day, 21 participants gave 102 volunteer hours.  Those in the Big Sit observed 41 species of birds.  Approximately 50 wildlife-friendly trees, shrubs, and vines were planted.  If you visit the Cussetah Bottoms area, you can see the plants, which are marked with bright pink ties.  What a great celebration of our National Wildlife Refuges!


Contact Info: Lori Jones, 505-248-6484, lori_jones@fws.gov



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