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Restoring Alligator Snapping Turtles to Their Native Habitat
Southwest Region, June 19, 2008
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Fishery Biologist Rebecca Fillmore of the Tishomingo NFH, Oklahoma, releases alligator snapping turtle into Hulah Lake area, June 19, 2008.  Photo by Staff.
Fishery Biologist Rebecca Fillmore of the Tishomingo NFH, Oklahoma, releases alligator snapping turtle into Hulah Lake area, June 19, 2008. Photo by Staff. - Photo Credit: n/a

 

Fishery biologists from the Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery assessed the area along the Caney River into Hulah Lake to be satisfactory for a restorative attempt for the alligator snapping turtle.  Ninety juvenile alligator snapping turtles were released at this site to replenish the vanishing population.  Since these turtles are not very aggressive, the public will probably not see them resting on the bottom of the lake or river waiting on their next unsuspecting meal.  The alligator snapping turtle is omnivorous, eating both plants and animals; thus, it is extremely important to the food chain in the aquatic community.  Station biologists will conduct sampling tasks next spring to assess the success of the restocking effort.  Each turtle has been tagged for identification with a band on its hind leg readable by a scanner. 


Contact Info: Martin Valdez, 505-248-6599, martin_valdez@fws.gov



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