Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
CARLSBAD FWO: Local Students Experience Wonders of San Dieguito Lagoon
California-Nevada Offices , April 16, 2008
Print Friendly Version
Students from Del Mar Hills Elementary School enjoying birdwatching at San Dieguito Lagoon.  Photo Credit:S.Wynn/USFWS
Students from Del Mar Hills Elementary School enjoying birdwatching at San Dieguito Lagoon. Photo Credit:S.Wynn/USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a
Biologist David Zoutendyk from the Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office educates students about native birds at San Dieguito Lagoon.  Photo Credit: S.Wynn/USFWS
Biologist David Zoutendyk from the Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office educates students about native birds at San Dieguito Lagoon. Photo Credit: S.Wynn/USFWS - Photo Credit: n/a

Jane Hendron, Carlsbad FWO
 A group of third graders from Del Mar Hills Elementary School enjoyed a field trip on April 16, 2008, to the San Dieguito Lagoon. 

Susan Wynn and David Zoutendyk, biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office joined with other scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Southern California Edison to provide the students with an opportunity to learn about the plants, animals, and fish that rely on coastal wetlands in southern California.  The field trip was organized by Del Mar Hills science teacher Nancy Swanberg as part of the students’ science unit on plant and animal adaptations. 

The April field trip was the first time students toured San Dieguito Lagoon which is currently undergoing a major restoration effort.  The restoration project entails reopening the lagoon to the ocean to re-establish the natural tidal influence; creating nesting habitat for the State endangered Belding’s savannah sparrow, the federally endangered California least tern and other shorebirds; and planting of native vegetation.  “Teaching the children about the lagoon’s biological resources and the Service’s role in conserving coastal wetlands was a really rewarding experience,” said Zoutendyk.

The field trip is one of several efforts being taken to increase public awareness and appreciation for the lagoon and its natural resources.  According to Wynn, “for many of the kids, this was their first chance to use binoculars and see different bird species up close.”    

Work on the restoration project is estimated to cost approximately $86 million, all of which is funded by Southern California Edison to offset impacts associated with the operations of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station.  The restoration effort is expected to be completed in December 2009.


Contact Info: Scott Flaherty, , Scott_Flaherty@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer