Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
Land Acquisition through the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration (WSFR) Program (formerly Federal Assistance Division)
Southwest Region, September 30, 2007
Print Friendly Version

Region 2 provided technical assistance to grantees and subgrantees to develop and implement land acquisition grants.  The following lands were acquired in Region 2 for Fiscal Year 2007:

·        Funded by the Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program (C-22-DL), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, as grantee, and Galveston County, as subgrantee, acquired in fee simple the 60.38-acre McAllis Point tract.  This acquisition is for the purpose of conserving coastal wetland habitat for the benefit of wildlife and bird species. 

·        Funded by the Habitat Conservation Plan Land Acquisition grant program, (E-29-L) Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, as grantee, and Bastrop County, as subgrantee, acquired in fee simple the 265.685-acre Francis tract.  This acquisition is for the purpose and benefit of the endangered Houston Toad and its habitat. 

·        Funded by the Endangered Species Section 6 Recovery Land Acquisition grant program (E-73-RL), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, as grantee, and Williamson County, as subgrantee, acquired a conservation easement on the 64.40-acre Cobb Preserve tract.  This acquisition will allow for a portion of the Cobb Cavern, one of the largest habitats known for endangered terrestrial karst invertebrates in Texas to be permanently preserved.  The Cavern is home to at least six species of rare and endangered terrestrial karst invertebrates, two of which are endangered, the Bone Cave harvestman and Coffin Cave mold beetle and one Neoleptoneta anopica (no common name) is known only from Cobb Cavern.  The Cobb Preserve with Cobb Spring is also part of an integrated karst hydrologic system. Cobb Spring is known to contain the Georgetown salamander, a candidate for endangered status.

·        Funded by the Endangered Species Recovery Land Acquisition grant program (E-85-RL), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, as grantee, and City of San Marcos, Texas, as subgrantee, acquired in fee simple the 250-acre Sink Creek tract.  This property is located above the San Marcos Springs, Spring Lake, and the San Marcos River and its acquisition will contribute to the watershed and protect habitat for the following federally listed species: San Marcos Salamander, Texas Wild Rice, Texas Blind Salamander, Fountain Darter, Comal Springs Riffle Beetle, Golden-cheeked Warbler, and the San Marcos Gambusia.

·        Funded by the Landowner Incentive Program (LIP) grant (I-2-T-2), Arizona Game and Fish Department, as grantee, and the Arizona Open Land Trust, as subgrantee, acquired a conservation easement on the 960-acre 47 Ranch.  The acquisition of this conservation easement will protect and benefit the wildlife habitat for the following species:  Chiricahua leopard frog, lowland leopard frog, Cochise pincushion cactus, jaguar, lesser long-nosed bat, Northern aplomado falcon, ocelot, black-tailed prairie.  LIP eligible species found on the property include:  Gila monster, badger, Baird’s sparrow, loggerhead shrike, Northern harrier, Northern pintail, tropical kingbird, violet-crowned hummingbird, western burrowing owl, white-winged dove, and desert box turtle. 

Contact Info: Martin Valdez, 505-248-6599, martin_valdez@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer