Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
Missouri Ecological Services Partners with Missouri’s Botanical Garden, Department of Conservation and Native Plant Society to Produce a Comprehensive Plant List for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge
Midwest Region, October 12, 2007
Print Friendly Version
Missouri ES biologist Dr. Paul McKenzie demonstrates his multipurpose dragonfly net-aquatic plant collecting pole at Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. McKenzie uses the instrument to conduct botanical surveys across the state. 
- FWS photo
Missouri ES biologist Dr. Paul McKenzie demonstrates his multipurpose dragonfly net-aquatic plant collecting pole at Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. McKenzie uses the instrument to conduct botanical surveys across the state.

- FWS photo

- Photo Credit: n/a
Fish and wildlife biologist Dr. Paul McKenzie kneels in a patch of purple loosestrife in Holt County. Eradication of the invasive species will be scheduled in the near future. 
- FWS photo
Fish and wildlife biologist Dr. Paul McKenzie kneels in a patch of purple loosestrife in Holt County. Eradication of the invasive species will be scheduled in the near future.

- FWS photo

- Photo Credit: n/a
One of the largest populations of purple loosestrife in Missouri was discovered at Wolf Creek Bend Conservation Area. This invasive species can be found in every state except Florida. 
- FWS photo
One of the largest populations of purple loosestrife in Missouri was discovered at Wolf Creek Bend Conservation Area. This invasive species can be found in every state except Florida.

- FWS photo

- Photo Credit: n/a

As part of a statewide effort to produce comprehensive plant lists for all Missouri refuges, fish and wildlife biologist Dr. Paul McKenzie teamed up with Dr. George Yatskievych, Tom Nagel, and Rex Hill to survey plants on the Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) from September 19th to 21st. 

 

Missouri Ecological Services combined efforts with Missouri’s Botanical Garden, Department of Conservation (MDC), and Native Plant Society (MONPS) to add to the refuge’s current plant list cumulated from botanical surveys previously conducted.

 

In addition to examining the plant collection on file in the Squaw Creek NWR herbarium, the team also conducted a plant survey on MDC’s newly acquired Wolf Creek Bend Conservation Area in Holt County. 

 

Upon survey completion, surveyors documented approximately 377 species of plants on the Squaw Creek NWR including 18 rare species tracked by MDC, and the unfortunate discovery of a large population of the invasive exotic purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) on the Wolf Creek Bend Conservation Area. 

 

The population of purple loosestrife was one of the largest ever discovered in Missouri and will be scheduled for eradication in the near future. 

 

In 2006 Missouri Ecological Services established a cooperative partnership with Service National Wildlife Refuge staff, Missouri Botanical Garden, MONPS, and MDC to develop plant lists for all Missouri refuges.  

 

Initial surveys conducted on the Mingo National Wildlife Refuge in the fall 2006 and early summer 2007 resulted in the discovery of nearly 500 plant species, including 16 rare species that are tracked by MDC. 

 

The team plans to return to Squaw Creek NWR next year in early June in hopes of adding to the growing plant list. Following the completion of botanical surveys on Squaw Creek NWR, similar efforts are planned in the future for other national wildlife refuges in Missouri.


Contact Info: Larry Dean, 612-713-5312, Larry_Dean@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer