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Habitat Assessment and Monitoring Program (HAMP) 2005 Annual Report Completed
Midwest Region, February 28, 2007
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The 2005 HAMP annual report was completed in February, 2007.  The 2005 field season was the initial year of biological monitoring of created Shallow Water Habitat (SWH) areas. 

 

The program is intended to monitor man-made aquatic habitat improvement sites on the channelized portion of the Missouri River.  These sites are constructed by the Army Corps of Engineers and are intended to increase the diversity of aquatic habitats found in the Missouri River.  These projects will hopefully begin to increase specific habitats critical to the federally endangered pallid sturgeon. 

 

This initial season provided the sampling foundation for the project. Much of the season was dedicated to gear exploration, creation of a sampling design, and the acquisition of equipment and personnel. 

 

Sampling was comprised of two major components, biological and physical.  Biological sampling targeted fish and was conducted by the Columbia Fishery Resources Office as well as other federal and state partners. Columbia FRO deployed eight different gear types on six selected bends. Fieldwork was conducted from June-October.

 

Monitoring will provide construction engineers with information on how fish are responding to these constructed sites and how to get the best biological response from each construction site.

 

Annual reports are usually written in the off season directly following the field season. Report preparation for the 2005 field season was delayed while the agencies developed standardized sampling, data, and reporting guidelines for this new program. Report preparation began after completion of the 2006 field season.

Contact Info: Larry Dean, 612-713-5312, Larry_Dean@fws.gov



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