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Cibola NWR partners with Bureau of Reclamation to restore 886 acres for endangered species
Southwest Region, January 11, 2007
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Moist soil unit within Farm Unit I
Moist soil unit within Farm Unit I - Photo Credit: n/a
Planned restoration within Farm Unit I
Planned restoration within Farm Unit I - Photo Credit: n/a
Planned restoration (cottonwood/willow/mesquite mosaic) within Unit I
Planned restoration (cottonwood/willow/mesquite mosaic) within Unit I - Photo Credit: n/a

Cibola National Wildlife Refuge is working on a partnership with Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to include 886 acres into the Lower Colorado River Multi-species Conservation Program (LCR MSCP).  USBR is the implementing agency for the LCR MSCP.  Part of the program’s goals is to conserve habitat and work toward the recovery of threatened and endangered species, as well as reduce the likelihood of additional species being listed.  Reclamation is approaching landowners willing to dedicate their land and water for restoration or creation of these specific habitats.

The purpose of this project is to establish cottonwood-willow habitat as well as other wetland and riparian habitats on 886 acres of Farm Unit I aimed at benefiting two endangered and threatened species.  Southwestern willow flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus) (ENDANGERED) and yellow-billed cuckoos (Coccyzus americanus occidentalis) (UNDER REVIEW FOR LISTING) are the primary target species.  In combination with the other habitats (native mesquite riparian and seasonal wetlands and grasses), Cibola NWR expects significant benefits for migrational uses from Neotropical songbirds.  Also, migrational and possible breeding habitat may be recognized in wetlands and associated grassy areas depending on plant species that could be used by California black rails (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus) (THREATENED-STATE OF CALIFORNIA).  In addition, any wetland or grassland areas with shallow water and/or moist soil conditions are expected to attract various shallow feeding waterfowl, wading bird, sandhill cranes and shorebird species within this desert region.


Contact Info: Martin Valdez, 505-248-6599, martin_valdez@fws.gov



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