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KODIAK: The Youth Effect,Have you heardabout it?
Alaska Region, December 30, 2013
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Leila Pyle, YCC, helps inflate a raft at Frazer Lake in the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge.
Leila Pyle, YCC, helps inflate a raft at Frazer Lake in the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. - Photo Credit: Anelise Zimmer
Kodiak youth assist biologists with an invasive plant survey.
Kodiak youth assist biologists with an invasive plant survey. - Photo Credit: Anelise Zimmer
YCC Crew Leader, Anelise Zimmer and YCC intern, Lady Ann Marcelo help stain a deck at a remote public use cabin.
YCC Crew Leader, Anelise Zimmer and YCC intern, Lady Ann Marcelo help stain a deck at a remote public use cabin. - Photo Credit: Shelly Lawson

“You’re probably familiar with the Doppler effect and should definitely know about the greenhouse effect, but have you ever heard of the Youth Effect?”

 

That’s the introduction to a five minute video created by 2013 Kodiak Refuge Youth Conservation Corp (YCC) member Leila Pyle. In it she coins the term, Youth Effect and describes it as a three step process: Take a youth, add nature, and an opportunity to engage. With contagious enthusiasm she then highlights ways to engage youth within our public lands.

At the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge, local residents make up the majority of our educational program participants. It’s one of the characteristics of having a refuge on a remote island in the Gulf of Alaska. Since we offer programs for pre-K through high school, we have had the unique privilege of seeing children grow up as they participate in our programs over the years. Some later even join our workforce.

Our 2013 YCC Crew Leader, Anelise Zimmer, although new in her position, was not a newcomer to the Kodiak Refuge. During elementary school she was in our science camp program, Salmon Camp. Later she volunteered to be an instructor’s aide for camp through the Kodiak Refuge Youth Leadership Program. Then, during her senior year of high school in 2012, Anelise was a member of the crew that she now leads as a seasonal ranger.

Leila Pyle also grew up with the refuge. Her father is a Kodiak Refuge biologist and fortunately for the Kodiak Refuge, she has been a part of many of our programs over the years. Like Anelise, she has given back by volunteering as an instructor’s aide for camp and for a number of special events and programs. Leila is an artist and has lead youth at the refuge in many ways that connect art with nature.

Engaging youth in our sites not only provides education in the moment, but encourages them to continue their involvement whether at your site or elsewhere. If a child comes to your site and says they want to be involved, find a way to include them. They may literally grow up connected to your refuge or public land and later become a volunteer or employee giving back to the very programs they once took part in. Promote the Youth Effect at your site!

Check out the Youth Effect at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOEz8FUon9E&feature=share&list=UUMqPAPfBGsDMs2UiD-5Tbbg


Contact Info: Michelle Lawson, 907-487-0283, Michelle_Lawson@fws.gov



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