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Chesapeake Bay Field Office Biologists Find Foster Nests for Osprey Chicks
Northeast Region, August 13, 2013
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CBFO biologists receive young ospreys from Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc. volunteer Suzi Feldhun
CBFO biologists receive young ospreys from Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc. volunteer Suzi Feldhun - Photo Credit: Pete McGowan USFWS
Chesapeake Conservation Corps (CCC) intern Christine Carpenter and Student Conservation Association (SCA) intern Audrey Bonk prepare to place osprey chick into foster nest.
Chesapeake Conservation Corps (CCC) intern Christine Carpenter and Student Conservation Association (SCA) intern Audrey Bonk prepare to place osprey chick into foster nest. - Photo Credit: Pete McGowan USFWS
Osprey chick is plced into foster nest on the South River, Maryland.
Osprey chick is plced into foster nest on the South River, Maryland. - Photo Credit: USFWS

Each year, the Chesapeake Bay Field Office (CBFO) works Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research Inc. in Newark, DE to place displaced osprey chicks into suitable foster nests located at the Paul S. Sarbanes Ecosystem Restoration Project at Poplar Island (PIERP) and other locations around the Chesapeake Bay.

 

This year on July 11, three pre-fledging ospreys that departed their nests prematurely were recovered and delivered to Tri-State for rehabilitation. After successful rehabilitation, all three chicks were delivered by Tri-State volunteer Suzi Feldhun to the CBFO biologists for relocation into suitably aged osprey foster nests located on the South River, Maryland. Then on July 17 and 25, two additional young ospreys were received from Tri-State and relocated into foster nests on the South River and PIERP.

In an effort to minimize holding times and stress on the foster chicks, the biologists conducted reconnaissance of several osprey the day before the chicks were to be relocated. Subsequent monitoring of the foster nests indicates that all five foster chicks successfully fledged. Biologists have successfully relocated 16 osprey young between 2009 and 2013.

For more information contact:
Peter McGowan
410/573-4523
peter_mcgowan@fws.gov


Contact Info: Kathryn Reshetiloff, 410-573-4582, kathryn_reshetiloff@fws.gov



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