Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
Bat Monitoring at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge
Northeast Region, December 21, 2012
Print Friendly Version
Examining the wings of a big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) for scars associated with white-nose syndrome.
Examining the wings of a big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) for scars associated with white-nose syndrome. - Photo Credit: USFWS
This stationary ultrasonic data logger will record bat calls as they fly over the Big Fish Creek Impoundment at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge, Shirley, NY.
This stationary ultrasonic data logger will record bat calls as they fly over the Big Fish Creek Impoundment at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge, Shirley, NY. - Photo Credit: USFWS

In conjunction with the Region 5 resident bat inventory, acoustic monitoring was conducted at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge during the summer of 2012. Acoustic monitoring utilized both active and passive stationary methods. Active monitoring was conducted at 6 points for a duration of 20 minutes per point. Two 3-night surveys were conducted during each of the following periods: 6/15-7/15, 7/15-8/15, and 8/15-9/30 for a total of 18 nights (36 hours). Passive monitoring was conducted at 18 points, deploying 3 data recorders at a time. Data collection began at solar sunset and continued for 3.5 hours. Data recorders were deployed at each survey point for 3 nights during each of the survey periods listed above for a total survey effort of 162 nights (567 hours). Analysis of the acoustic data will be completed this winter in cooperation with the Region 5 Inventory and Monitoring Program. In addition to the I&M funded bat work, we had the opportunity to conduct 4 nights of mist netting. The funding was provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL; Dept. of Energy). Mist netting was conducted on the nights of 7/30 through 8/1. We captured 32 big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), 7 eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), and 10 northern bats (Myotis septentrionalis). It should be noted that the contractor conducting the mist netting had not observed northern bats in New York State in these numbers since before the outbreak of white-nose syndrome (WNS). It is possible that a population of northern bats is present on Long Island that has yet to be strongly impacted by WNS. Further research would be necessary to confirm this theory.


Contact Info: Robin Donohue, 631-286-0485 ext. 2117, robin_donohue@fws.gov



Send to:
From:

Notes:
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer