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US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes

CONSERVATION PARTNERSHIPS:Southeast Alaska Biologists Recognized for Improving Habitat in Public Spaces

Region 7, May 28, 2013
Stichert (right) at work in Southeast Alaska
Stichert (right) at work in Southeast Alaska - Photo Credit: n/a
Duck Creek relocation project, Juneau, Alaska
Duck Creek relocation project, Juneau, Alaska - Photo Credit: n/a
Hudson (right) working with partners in Southeast Alaska.
Hudson (right) working with partners in Southeast Alaska. - Photo Credit: n/a
Stichert and Hudson accept the ALSA Alaska Chapter Greenbelt Award from ASLA National President Tom Tavella.
Stichert and Hudson accept the ALSA Alaska Chapter Greenbelt Award from ASLA National President Tom Tavella. - Photo Credit: n/a

Earlier this month, the Alaska Chapter American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) presented two U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologists—Neil Stichert and John Hudson—with the 2013 GreenBelt Award for their long-standing efforts to collaborate with others to improve fish and wildlife habitat in public spaces.

 

The GreenBelt Award recognizes colleagues who are not landscape architect professionals but support ASLA’s mission “to lead, educate and participate in the careful stewardship, wise planning and artful design of our cultural and natural environment.”

Michele Elfers, a landscape architect with the City and Borough of Juneau shed light on why Stichert and Hudson received recognition. “They offer such great technical support…they’ll come out to a site and are really in tune with the reality of construction.” Over the last few years, Stichert and Hudson have recognized and supported the role of landscape architects not only in the design phase, but also in the education, public relations and communication component that is so key to successful habitat restoration projects.

Elfers sees Stichert in particular as playing the role of a mentor in terms of how he’s provided a great example of how to foster effective communication between construction operators, regulators, and landowners and provide guidance during the construction phase of habitat restoration projects in Southeast Alaska. “That’s a skill and that’s why they’re so successful.” By extending the Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, Fish Passage Program, and Southeast Alaska Coastal Program from the Juneau Fish and Wildlife Field Office, Stichert and Hudson frequently bring together disparate interest groups and stakeholders to move the needle towards conservation.

Among the others recognized this year with GreenBelt Awards include former Gov. Tony Knowles, Sitka Parks Manager Lynne Brandon, Patricia Joyner and Stephen Nickel of the Alaska Community Forestry Program, Beth Nordlund of the Anchorage Park Foundation, Pat Leary from UAA’s Horticulture Department, and Phil Shephard (Great Land Trust).

Contact Info: Katrina Mueller, 907-786-3637, katrina_mueller@fws.gov