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US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes

Riparian Restoration at Sevilleta NWR

Region 2, February 13, 2013
Tree planting crew: about 2 dozen staff from the Southwest Regional office, Sevilleta NWR, and members of the New Mexico Invasive Species Strike Team, University of New Mexico and volunteers.
Tree planting crew: about 2 dozen staff from the Southwest Regional office, Sevilleta NWR, and members of the New Mexico Invasive Species Strike Team, University of New Mexico and volunteers. - Photo Credit: n/a
Newly planted trees in foreground, with older Gooding's willows directly behind, and large cottonwoods in background.
Newly planted trees in foreground, with older Gooding's willows directly behind, and large cottonwoods in background. - Photo Credit: n/a
Kari Gromotsky, Division of Fire Management, Southwest Regional Office, plants another tree for flycatchers and other riparian species.
Kari Gromotsky, Division of Fire Management, Southwest Regional Office, plants another tree for flycatchers and other riparian species. - Photo Credit: n/a
David Mendias, ARD for Budget and Administration, Southwest Region, plants another Gooding's willow.
David Mendias, ARD for Budget and Administration, Southwest Region, plants another Gooding's willow. - Photo Credit: n/a

On February 13, 2013, Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) employees, volunteers and interns spent all day planting trees at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR)!  There were a total of 2,071 trees planted as part of an on-going riparian restoration project along the Rio Grande.

This area had been overrun by tamarisk, an invasive non-native plant, and then cleared a few years ago. For this year's restoration efforts, one of the refuge employees drilled about 2,000 holes with a bobcat and auger over several days before the event. Meanwhile, several Service employees from Sevilleta NWR, the New Mexico Invasive Strike Team and the Los Lunas Inmate Work Camp crew harvested about 2,000 Gooding's willow poles from within the previously planted area adjacent to the new planting site.
 
 
 
 
 
About two dozen of these volunteers were employees from the Southwest Regional Office. We really appreciate their help! The refuge has been planting willows in this riparian area since 2009 to create habitat for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher. As of February 13, over 11,000 trees have been planted with the help of many volunteers.

Contact Info: Kathy Granillo, 505-864-4021 ext 111, kathy_granillo@fws.gov