WESPEN Online Order Form print this page
US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes

HOPPER MOUNTAIN NWRC: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Connects Kids and Teachers with Nature at Santa Barbara Zoo’s Science Day

Region 8, October 1, 2011
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff spent the day wowing kids with wildlife information (from left to right:  Jenny Marek, Michael Woodbridge, Ria Boner).
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff spent the day wowing kids with wildlife information (from left to right: Jenny Marek, Michael Woodbridge, Ria Boner). - Photo Credit: n/a
Kids, parents and teachers alike crowd around the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service booth at the Santa Barbara Zoo's Science Day October 1.
Kids, parents and teachers alike crowd around the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service booth at the Santa Barbara Zoo's Science Day October 1. - Photo Credit: n/a

By Michael Woodbridge, USFWS

 On Saturday, October 1, Ivett Plascencia (STEP student), Michael Woodbridge (Public Affairs Officer) and volunteer Ria Boner from the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex (HMNWRC), along with Jenny Marek (Biologist) from the Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (VFWO), hosted a booth at the Santa Barbara Zoo’s Science Day at the Zoo. It was a chance to connect kids and teachers with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s wildlife conservation efforts in the region, including the California Condor Recovery Program.

This is the third year in a row the Zoo has held a Science Day for area students and teachers and the Service has participated every year. The goal of Science Day at the Zoo is to get children and their families excited about science through the use of interactive hands-on activities, as well as to give teachers ideas for new and exciting science lessons they can take back to the classroom. The event took place from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s booth included a number of activities for the kids. Older children had the opportunity to learn about telemetry technology and how staff working on the California Condor Recovery Program use this equipment to track condors in the wild. Younger children played the habitat game, where they could match plants and animals with different habitat types. There were also opportunities for children and parents alike to touch animal hides, bones and feathers and look at pictures of California condors and other wildlife.

This year’s Science Day saw 2,200 guests in attendance, including more than 70 teachers. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service enjoys hosting a booth at the Zoo’s Science Day and appreciates the chance to educate children, families and teachers about the agency’s wildlife conservation efforts taking place right here in the greater Ventura County area.

Contact Info: Michael Woodbridge, 916-978-4445, michael_woodbridge@fws.gov