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US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes
REGION 8: Orange County Man Fined $7,500; Sentenced to Six Months Home Detention for Illegally Importing Asian Arowanas
Region 8, January 4, 2010
Customs and FWS wildlife inspectors at Los Angeles International Airport discovered the arowanas hidden in luggage. (photo: USFWS)
Customs and FWS wildlife inspectors at Los Angeles International Airport discovered the arowanas hidden in luggage. (photo: USFWS) - Photo Credit: n/a
One of the Asian arowana confiscated at Los Angeles International Airport in September 2009.
One of the Asian arowana confiscated at Los Angeles International Airport in September 2009. - Photo Credit: n/a

A Garden Grove, Calif., man who illegally imported endangered fish – Asian Arowanas– that were concealed in his luggage aboard a commercial airline flight in violation of the Endangered Species Act has been sentenced for smuggling six specimens into the United States.

Ricky Vu, 35, was sentenced December 28 to serve six months on home detention as part of a two-year period of probation, to perform 200 hours of community service, and to pay a criminal fine of $7,500. Vu was sentenced by United States District Judge Percy Anderson.

Vu pleaded guilty on October 15 to a misdemeanor charge of illegally importing an endangered species, admitting that he hid the Arowanas in his suitcase during a September 28 flight from Indonesia to Los Angeles International Airport. The fish were concealed in plastic bags that were filled with water to keep the fish alive. When he arrived at LAX, agents with the United States Fish & Wildlife Service and Customs and Border Protection searched his bag and found the fish alive.

The Asian Arowana – commonly called “dragon fish” or “lucky fish” – is native to Southeast Asia and can grow to up to three feet in length. Under the Endangered Species Act and international treaties, permits are required to export endangered or protected species from their country of origin, as well as import them into the United States. The permitting system is designed to protect species by preventing the creation of black markets for them in the United States and elsewhere. In the United States, Asian Arowanas can sell on the black market for thousands of dollars.

More information on federal wildlife protection laws, including information about import and export regulations is available at: http://www.fws.gov/le/

 

Contact Info: Scott Flaherty, , Scott_Flaherty@fws.gov