WESPEN Online Order Form print this page
US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes
STOCKTON FWO: East Bay Municipal Utilities District and the Anadromous Fish Restoration Program improve spawning habitat for salmon and steelhead in the Mokelumne River
Region 8, September 4, 2009
Front-end loader depositing and grading gravel in the Mokelumne River downstream of Camanche Dam (photo: Ramon Martin, USFWS).
Front-end loader depositing and grading gravel in the Mokelumne River downstream of Camanche Dam (photo: Ramon Martin, USFWS). - Photo Credit: n/a
Gravel replenishment site following gravel placement in the Mokelumne River downstream of Camanche Dam (photo: Ramon Martin, USFWS).
Gravel replenishment site following gravel placement in the Mokelumne River downstream of Camanche Dam (photo: Ramon Martin, USFWS). - Photo Credit: n/a
Before and after photos of one of the gravel replenishment sites on the Mokelumne River downstream of Camanche Dam (photo: Robin Bilski, EBMUD).
Before and after photos of one of the gravel replenishment sites on the Mokelumne River downstream of Camanche Dam (photo: Robin Bilski, EBMUD). - Photo Credit: n/a

By Donnie Ratcliff, Stockton FWO
Through a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service‚Äôs (USFWS) Anadromous Fish Restoration Program (AFRP), East Bay Municipal Utilities District (EBMUD) placed approximately 6,400 tons of spawning gravel in the Mokelumne River downstream of Camanche Dam during the first week of September, 2009.  Since 2001, EBMUD, University of California, Davis (UCD) and USFWS have worked collaboratively to design and implement gravel placement projects on the lower Mokelumne River.  The projects are designed to provide gravel replenishment and channel rehabilitation using the Spawning Habitat Integrated Rehabilitation Approach (SHIRA) developed by UCD.  The objectives of this continued effort are to increase availability and use of salmonid spawning areas by providing gravels within the appropriate size range, improve gravel permeability and inter-gravel water quality, decrease redd superimposition, and increase bed slope and floodplain connectivity of the river channel.  The ultimate goal of this project is to eliminate the gravel deficit below Camanche Dam and promote an increase in the natural production of fall-run Chinook salmon and Central Valley steelhead in the Mokelumne River.

The USFWS has secured funding to purchase and place another 6,000 to 6,500 tons of gravel in 2010 and 2,500 tons of gravel annually in 2011 and 2012.  Donnie Ratcliff, Habitat Restoration Coordinator with AFRP, assisted in completing the environmental compliance and permitting for this project.  Zac Jackson and Ramon Martin, also with AFRP, visited the site during project implementation and assisted with monitoring activities.

Contact Info: Ramon Martin, 209-334-2968 ext. 401, ramon_martin@fws.gov