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US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes
STOCKTON FWO: Incoming University of the Pacific students introduced to their local river and responsible leadership
Region 8, August 21, 2009
University of the Pacific incoming students learn about the M.O.V.E. program and the Calaveras River (photo: Donnie Ratcliff, USFWS).
University of the Pacific incoming students learn about the M.O.V.E. program and the Calaveras River (photo: Donnie Ratcliff, USFWS). - Photo Credit: n/a
University of the Pacific incoming students pick up trash while touring the Calaveras River (photo: Donnie Ratcliff, USFWS).
University of the Pacific incoming students pick up trash while touring the Calaveras River (photo: Donnie Ratcliff, USFWS). - Photo Credit: n/a

by Donnie Ratcliff, Stockton FWO
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other members of the Friends of the Lower Calaveras River (FLCR) presented information about the Calaveras River and its relationship to the greater Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed to incoming University of the Pacific (UOP) students during UOP’s 2009 Mountains, Ocean, Valley Experience (M.O.V.E.).  The M.O.V.E. program was started by UOP in 2007 to welcome new students to the greater Northern California area and expose them to the concept of responsible leadership through service projects.  The program offers students the chance to participate in activities across the region, ranging from the mountains of Yosemite National Park to the Pacific Ocean.  This was the first year that the Calaveras River site has been highlighted.  The day started with an introductory presentation by UOP staff and FLCR to introduce the students to the M.O.V.E. program and the Calaveras River site.  Following the presentation, students participated in a Calaveras River clean-up within and near the UOP campus.

FLCR is a diverse group of stakeholders united in the common goal of public awareness and education involving the Lower Calaveras River.  FLCR’s portion of the presentation was a collaborative effort accomplished by combining the skills of many of the group’s members.  The presentation was started by Dr. Stacy Luthy, a professor in UOP’s Biology Department and active FLCR member.  Dr. Luthy explained how the diverse topography, climate, and human impacts found in California have yielded a unique flora and fauna living in a highly altered network of water resources.  Donnie Ratcliff, Habitat Restoration Coordinator with the Service's Anadromous Fish Restoration Program and FLCR member, continued the presentation by discussing the past and present life-history of salmon and steelhead in the Calaveras River, current challenges to aquatic resources in the river, and impacts of introduced species to the system.  Jeremy Terhune and Jim Marsh directly represented FLCR and highlighted the many values that citizens can find in the Calaveras River while sharing the mission and goals of FLCR.  The entire presentation focused on the local river that runs through the UOP campus and showed students how they might participate in efforts to raise awareness and restore the system.

Contact Info: Ramon Martin, 209-334-2968 ext. 401, ramon_martin@fws.gov