WESPEN Online Order Form print this page
US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes
SAN DIEGO NWR: Volunteers Add 1,000 Native Grasses to California's Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve
Region 8, April 4, 2009
Volunteer day for planting native grass at CA Dept. of Fish and Game's Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve, a joint project of the Reserve and San Diego NWR.  Photos by Jill Terp (FWS) and Earl Cryer (Volunteer).
Volunteer day for planting native grass at CA Dept. of Fish and Game's Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve, a joint project of the Reserve and San Diego NWR. Photos by Jill Terp (FWS) and Earl Cryer (Volunteer). - Photo Credit: n/a
Grass plugs awaiting planting at farm. Photo by Earl S. Cryer (escphoto.com)
Grass plugs awaiting planting at farm. Photo by Earl S. Cryer (escphoto.com) - Photo Credit: n/a

by Jill Terp, San Diego NWR
Over 1,000 native grasses are now in the ground and growing at the California Department of Fish and Game's Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve thanks to the efforts of 48 volunteers and staff.  In March and April 2009, the grass plugs were planted to fulfill the vision of a grass farm that will serve as seed source for native habitat restoration at the Reserve and the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge.

 

Volunteers carefully transplanted purple needlegrass (Nassella pulchra) and San Diego County needlegrass (Achnatherum diegoense) from their growing tubes, then watered and surrounded each grass plug with a protective plastic tube.  In less than eight total hours, the amazing team accomplished not only the grass planting but also weeded a recently planted native cactus farm.

 

Big cheers for the hard work of biology students from Southwestern College (who earned extra credit), the students' families and friends, and our wonderful volunteers of Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve and San Diego National Wildlife Refuge.  Their hard work has transformed the idea of a native plant nursery into a reality that will provide a lasting conservation legacy in southern San Diego County.

 

The native grasses that were planted will serve as seed source for habitat restoration on hundreds of conserved acres in southern San Diego County.  Over time, the grass farm along with the adjacent cactus propagation area, as well as a planned native shrub/tree nursery, will provide necessary plant materials to restore habitats for endangered, threatened, and rare species.

 

Contact Info: Scott Flaherty, , Scott_Flaherty@fws.gov