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US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes
CARLSBAD FWO: 2008 National Junior Duck Stamp Contest Winners Announced
Region 8, May 7, 2008
Lydia Han, age 15, of San Jose, California, took second place with her water-color depicting a pair of ruddy ducks called
Lydia Han, age 15, of San Jose, California, took second place with her water-color depicting a pair of ruddy ducks called "Contented Pair." (USFWS Photo by Don Brubaker) - Photo Credit: n/a
Eighteen year-old Seokkyun Hong of Dallas, Texas, won Best of Show for her depiction of a pair of Nene (Hawaiian goose)
Eighteen year-old Seokkyun Hong of Dallas, Texas, won Best of Show for her depiction of a pair of Nene (Hawaiian goose) - Photo Credit: n/a
Renowned wildlife artist and Federal Duck Stamp winner Joe Hautman (left) joins other judges to evaluate entries. (USFWS photo by Don Brubaker)
Renowned wildlife artist and Federal Duck Stamp winner Joe Hautman (left) joins other judges to evaluate entries. (USFWS photo by Don Brubaker) - Photo Credit: n/a

Stephanie Weagley, Carlsbad FWO
Seokkyun Hong
of Dallas, Texas, was selected as the winner of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Federal Junior Duck Stamp Design Contest April 17, 2008, at the San Diego Zoo The 18-year-olds’s oil painting of a pair of Nene (Hawaiian goose) was judged the top entry among the Best-of-Show art entries from 50 states, the District of Columbia and American Samoa. Her artwork design will be featured on the 2008-2009 Federal Junior Duck Stamp.  

Other contest winners were Lydia Han, age 15, of San Jose, California, who took second place with her water-color depicting a pair of ruddy ducks called "Contented Pair", while third place went to Rebekah Nastav, age 17, of Amoret, Missouri for her rendition of a single hooded merganser called “Evening Swim” done in acrylic. Jeriel Chalk from Colorado produced the winning Conservation Message "Conservation is our respect for the past, participation of the present, and our responsibility to the future."

Because southern California was chosen as the host location for the national wildlife art competition, more than 30 Service employees and partners from California, including Nevada and Arizona, volunteered their time to assist the Washington Duck Stamp Program staff with the event.

Steve Thompson, the Service’s California and Nevada Regional Director opened the contest with welcoming remarks and Paul Schmidt, assistant director of the Service's Migratory Bird Program served as the master of ceremonies.  

A distinguished panel of five judges  selected the winners from more than 50 entries. Judges included were: Joseph Hautman, Chief Judge and 2008-2009 Federal Duck Stamp winning artist; Mike Chrisman, Secretary, California Resources Agency; Berit Durler, President of the Zoological Society of San Diego; Gary Kramer, former Refuge Manager of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex; and Robert McLandress, Ph.D., President of the California Waterfowl Association.

Highlights from the contest day included Joseph Hautman teaching a waterfowl art class to a group of approximately 60 third and fourth graders. Waterfowl mounted specimens and pictures of ducks provided Joseph and his volunteer teaching assistants with excellent visual aides for the students to create their drawings. Additional student activities included a conservation walk to the zoo’s water ponds where various bird and duck species peacefully gathered.

Another bright moment at this year’s national contest was when noted California arts educator, Dr. Joan Allemand was paid a special tribute. In 1989, with a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Dr. Allemand developed the Federal Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program, a program which is still used today. Under her direction, the dynamic arts curriculum debuted in 1990 as a pilot program in several California schools. During that first year, 3,000 students in public and private schools participated. Today, approximately, 27,000 participate nationwide. 

The Junior Duck Stamp Contest winner, Seokkyun Hong, receives a free trip to Washington, D.C., along with her art teacher, a parent, and state coordinator, to be honored at the First Day of Sale Ceremony in June 2008. The first-place winner also receives a $5,000 award, while the second place winner receives $3,000 and the third-place winner receives $2,000. All proceeds from the sale of Junior Duck Stamps, which sell for $5, are used solely to support the environmental education Program and awards for contest winners.

Service employees and program partners were extremely honored to have been able to play such an active role in this year’s Junior Duck Stamp national art contest.  This program is truly a great way to engage children in learning important lessons about wildlife conservation and connecting them with their natural world.

Contact Info: Scott Flaherty, , Scott_Flaherty@fws.gov