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US Fish & Wildlife Service Journal

2002-2012 Fisheries Restoration and Irrigation Mitigation Act Program Accomplishments Report

Region 1, March 25, 2012
Cover page for 2002-2012 FRIMA Program Accomplishments Report
Cover page for 2002-2012 FRIMA Program Accomplishments Report - Photo Credit: n/a
Warren Colyer of Trout Unlimited and Les Perkins and Dan Kliensmith of Farmers Conservation Alliance assessing a flatplate screen installation on a diversion in Idaho.
Warren Colyer of Trout Unlimited and Les Perkins and Dan Kliensmith of Farmers Conservation Alliance assessing a flatplate screen installation on a diversion in Idaho. - Photo Credit: n/a
FRIMA restores habitat for a wide range of fish species.
FRIMA restores habitat for a wide range of fish species. - Photo Credit: n/a
Bart Garnett of U.S. Forest Service leads a field tour of FRIMA projects in Big Lost River, Idaho.
Bart Garnett of U.S. Forest Service leads a field tour of FRIMA projects in Big Lost River, Idaho. - Photo Credit: n/a
This project removed outdated wood-pin and plank diversion strcutres at two sites on Morrell Creek in Montana, replacing them with rock weir step-pools to improve upstream fish passage for bull trout.
This project removed outdated wood-pin and plank diversion strcutres at two sites on Morrell Creek in Montana, replacing them with rock weir step-pools to improve upstream fish passage for bull trout. - Photo Credit: n/a

The Fisheries Restoration and Irrigation Mitigation Act (FRIMA) enacted by Congress in 2000 (P.L. 106-502) establishes a voluntary, non-regulatory program for irrigators and water users to provide safe passage for fish while continuing to meet their water use needs. The FRIMA Program, administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), provides matching federal funding for design and construction of fish passage projects at water diversion structures in the Pacific drainage area of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and western Montana.

 

FRIMA Program investments to date have created an estimated 451 jobs and over $66.5 million in goods and services. To date, roughly $13.8 million in federal funding has been appropriated by Congress for the FRIMA Program, distributed almost equally between the four states. Federal FRIMA funds have been matched by over $15.9 million in partner funds, exceeding the 35% non-federal match requirement. The total federal and partner match for the FRIMA Program to date is $29.7 million.

Overall, a total of 127 projects have been funded resulting in 1,130 miles of habitat re-opened to fish passage, 56 fish passage barriers removed or modified, 130 water diversions and irrigation pumps screened, and 18 fish passage inventories completed. Many different fish species benefit from FRIMA projects as do many local communities. FRIMA funding invested to date has also yielded substantial economic benefits in communities.

Congress appropriated funding to the Service for the FRIMA Program from fiscal year 2002 through 2007. The original act expired in 2007 and was re-authorized in 2009, extending it to 2015. No funding has been appropriated since fiscal year 2007. A report on FRIMA Program accomplishments was prepared and distributed in 2005, summarizing expenditures and attainments from fiscal year 2002-2004. Our latest report summarizes all FRIMA Program accomplishments from its inception through fiscal year 2012.

Contact Info: Sean Connolly, 503-231-2353, Sean_Connolly@fws.gov