Conserving the Nature of America
Exelon will jump start fish restoration by trapping American shad (pictured) and river herring at Conowingo and transporting them upstream of all dams on the river to their spawning grounds. Credit: USFWS
Eagles hold a revered place in our nation’s history and culture. Credit: Todd Harless/USFWS

New Science Provides Foundation for Proposed Changes to Service’s Eagle Conservation and Management Program

May 04, 2016
In a move designed to maintain strong protections for bald and golden eagles, the Service is opening a 60-day public comment period on proposed improvements to its comprehensive eagle conservation and management program. The proposed changes include modifications to the regulations governing permits for incidental take of bald and golden eagles that will protect eagle populations during the course of otherwise lawful human activities.
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Exelon will jump start fish restoration by trapping American shad (pictured) and river herring at Conowingo and transporting them upstream of all dams on the river to their spawning grounds. Credit: USFWS
Exelon will jump start fish restoration by trapping American shad (pictured) and river herring at Conowingo and transporting them upstream of all dams on the river to their spawning grounds. Credit: USFWS

Landmark agreement with Exelon uses cutting-edge science to drive fishes' return to Susquehanna River

May 02, 2016
Exelon Generation and the Service have agreed to restore American shad and river herring to the Susquehanna River, the East Coast’s largest river, over the next 50 years. Shad and river herring are returning to their spawning grounds on the Susquehanna at their lowest numbers since the 1980s. Exelon will improve fish passage facilities at Conowingo Dam and transport up to 100,000 American shad and 100,000 river herring annually to their spawning grounds above all four dams.
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From Left to Right: Ricardo Romo, president of the University of Texas at San Antonio; Cheryl Jefferson, U.S. Forest Service; Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director of the Service’s Southwest Region; and Ivy Taylor, Mayor of San Antonio. Credit: Katie Latta/USFWS
From Left to Right: Ricardo Romo, president of the University of Texas at San Antonio; Cheryl Jefferson, U.S. Forest Service; Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director of the Service’s Southwest Region; and Ivy Taylor, Mayor of San Antonio. Credit: Katie Latta/USFWS

City of San Antonio Steps It Up For Monarchs

May 02, 2016
Mayors of towns and cities across America are pitching in to help save the monarch butterfly from possible extinction. One of our partners, The National Wildlife Federation, has created the Mayors’ Monarch Pledge that helps cities take specific actions to benefit this species. Last week, Mayor Ivy Taylor of San Antonio, Texas, received accolades from Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director of the Service’s Southwest Region, for being the first mayor to agree to take all 24 actions outlined in the pledge. In addition, Ricardo Romo, president of the University of Texas at San Antonio, signed the Monarch Pledge.
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